Causes of Ireland’s Gender Pay Gap & Working Women’s Income

shows the gender pay gap in Ireland with the average pay for men and the average pay for women

‘Money. It is not the root of all evil. It makes the world go ‘round. It is a source of power. It is the freedom to pursue our dreams. And — no secret here — we women have less of it than men do. “

Ellevest, Mind the Gap Guide
  • Collectively working women earned less than working men (the “unadjusted gender pay gap”). On average in 2019, an Irish woman earned  €2879 every month, while the average man earned  3885.
  • Collectively working women earned 26% less than men or € 12,072 annually.
=> Learn the facts related to women earning money in Ireland?

Phrases To Challenge Conversational Inequality At Work

Gender Inequality Phrases Workplace

 #ChooseToChallenge  – International Women’s Day 2021
How to support colleagues who are being silenced verbally at work.

Each of us is responsible for our own thoughts and actions. It may not be easy, but we can ‘choose to challenge’ conversational inequality. Prepare a phrase to avoid brain freeze when faced with conversational inequalities. 

=> Find Your Phrase To Help You Choose to Challenge

Negotiation – What Do You Want …….

Tell me what you want, what you really really want …

The wonderful lyrics of the Spice girls 1996 (yes, it’s that long ago) hit song. Sometimes knowing what we really want is a complex mix of work and life priorities, each challenging the other for pole position, and they are just the items that are in our awareness. Knowing where to invest your time, how to ask for what you want in negotiations (link to negotiation workshop) or next step in your career can require reflection and analysis of one’s current context.

=> Explore What You Really WAnt

Ireland’s Local Governmental Approach to Gender Equality SDG 5.5

Irish Local Government Approach to SDG 5

SDG Target 5.5 states: “Ensure women’s full and effective participation and equal opportunities for leadership at all levels of decision-making in political, economic and public life”. Gendelity reviews Ireland’s approach to SDG 5.5 at local government level.

Is your local government acting on Ireland’s national ambitions to achieve SDG 5.5?

Firstly, the status of relevant SDG 5 indicators are explored. Then the make-up of the three key groups of local government decision makers is considered. Finally, we explore how these decision makers are acting to progress SDG 5.

=> Explore The Status & Frameworks of Local Government & SDG 5.5

Stats on Workplace Gender-Related Discrimination in Ireland

Despite being better educated overall, women aged 25-64, with a degree in Ireland earn 28% less than their male counterparts (OECD). In the 2019 workplace 39% of women report experiencing discrimination. 1/3 indicate the discrimination was gender-based (CSO 2019). Globally based on current trends, it will take 257 years to close the gender gap in economic opportunity (UN 2020).

=> Get the Facts About Irish Workplaces & Discrimination